VIEWS NOT NEWS

The freelancer’s dilemma


Many months back we posted a ‘true cost of agency workers’ article on the site. About how full-time (general) staff’s salary is actually about half what it really costs a company to employ them.

We still get the occasional response to that post – our posts attract all sorts of oddballs. Which we don’t mind.

If you missed it, we took a vote some weeks’ back and picked one of the oddballest ones. And published it with our comments. After all, the freelance oddball who wrote to us asked us to do this. And anonymity was, accordingly, preserved.

Image result for freelancers dilemma

Rated daily

Now, by popular consent – and never ones to turn down a challenge – our fearless crew here at VnN, re-publish the letter together with our comments. And, to spice things up a little, the comments from our readers, too.

But first, the original letter:

Dear Ed

I’m appalled. I’ve just been for my third ‘interview’ (they’ve really been nothing more than informal chats) with an agency looking to appoint an experienced and successful freelance new biz person. Me!

At least that’s what I thought as we’ve had good chats and we seem to get on well enough. They tell me they have a great product and their fab clients love them muchly. And so they want to grow. They see me as helping them to do that. And I’d like to make it happen.

So far so good.

Now for the not-so-good. They have offered me less than I have asked for as my day-rate. As requested, I gave them a range of £x (the lowest amount) to £y (the top of the range) and they’ve come back with £x minus £z. Which means I don’t even get to £w. If you get my drift?

Unfortunately, I have to admit this grates. But what do I do? If I turn them down, then I’ll end up with zip. If I accept their lower-than-my-stated £x threshold rate, I’ll be continuously hacked-off that they’re getting me on the cheap. So I won’t do a great job and it’ll all, most likely, end in tears.

Agencies are always hacked off when their (new) clients try to screw them down. And that sours the whole relationship before it even starts. What should I do?

Yours confused…

Read more…

We’re hiring! Why every job isn’t fantastic.


If you happened to be scanning a jobs section and this popped up, would you give it a second thought?

Marketing assistant 
Dull and limited position demanding masses of isolated and unrewarding routine work and with no likely future prospects for candidates hugely unconcerned about success…show more

And even though it may not be your ‘thing’, how about this one?

Marketing executive
Exciting and varied role inviting masses of individual and rewarding research work and with infinite likely future prospects for candidates hugely passionate about succeeding…show more

See what we did there? It’s the same job!

Melbourne boring jobs

Management excluded: they rarely come in on Fridays

So it seems churlish even to have asked the question, doesn’t it.

Yet the first ‘extract’, above, is often the subtext for what many marketing jobs are really like and how they sometimes end up becoming.

So why is this? Why is it that every advertised job is, potentially, such a great opportunity? When, as we all know from experience, as VnN staffers will readily testify, reality can be rather different.

Enter, briefly, 44-year old Parisian Frédéric Desnard. As was reported in last week’s press, Frédéric didn’t think his job was that great. Not for four, depressing years in fact.

So Frédéric, as is the tendency in France among the disgruntled, took action direct. He decided to sue his company for boring him to (near) death. For over four years. He maintains no Read more…

It’s only a game


Staffers at Views not News are suffering from FSAD: Football Season Affective Disorder. Sadly, no one at VnN HQ saw the light back in August 2015 when Ladbrokes offered the now not-so-crazy odds on Leicester City’s Premiership campaign.

So who’s not sick at missing out on a 5000-1 ‘certainty’? Well, certain now on this final morning of April 2016, anyway?

There can’t be many easier ways of making a wedge for so little effort. United’s mostly morose LVG must now stand for Leicester’s Victory Game. Even without suspended Jamie Vardy.

And even if they don’t win on Sunday thanks to a very unsporting Man U mistakenly thinking their league position means anything at all to anyone, most teams, Tottenham apart, beat Chelsea at the Bridge nowadays (Leicester’s final game this season) so BIG Congrats Leicester City and Claudio Ranieri.

Image result for bhs

“You’ve all done very well.”

Theatre of Dreams

Yet for one man there’s an even more rewarding game than footie. A game that pays out much MUCH more. It’s called retailing. Read more…

Email biters bit


Surprised to read that meedja folk don’t like emails. Selling ones, that is.

Announced they’re being snowed by retailers after they bought something from them.

aaa

Curious incident of the email in the inbox

But maybe yours was one of the sympathetic 132 comments agreeing with the posting person, Tom Godwin, right.

If you missed / can’t read his post it says: Retailers…..stop signing me up to daily email lists because I’ve bought something from you. Brands needs to get a more realistic view of their importance in people’s lives.

After all, while Tom is completely unknown to VnN, isn’t he directly representative of – or at least a key part of – the industry that advises clients on how they should be selling stuff to customers? You know…how and where to place their comms? And, wait for it, isn’t email on their clients’ media schedule? Somewhere?

Surprised VnN would be (again) if email wasn’t included as part of their clients’ proposed multi-channel strategies.

So why are the media’s advocates getting so het up? Is it still news to anyone that providing your email address to an organisation means they just might use it…? Read more…

Banking made inhuman


One in five Brits can’t read their bank statements, claims an 82-page FCA report which landed on our desk last week*.

Nope, VnN dudes didn’t read it, either. Finance always sounds so dull. And 82 page-zzz…

Even though we didn’t attend Bank Statement reading classes at school, either, we don’t get why something so basic should be so baffling.

Our bank statements normally come in two simple sizes: ‘overdrawn’ or ‘very overdrawn’.

Banking made inhuman

I obey

But help is on the way.

In our much-loved and exciting technology-led fashion, banks are deploying robots to give us poor financial services-challenged and low-wage, bank-statement-illiterate bobos new, state-of-the-art, robo-advice.

And we said finance was dull? We did.

So in our readers’ interests VnN has done a little digging. Not for gold but for robo-info. Because the future of our individual financial health is likely to get even trickier than not being able to read simple bank statements. Read more…

What’s in a mononym?


Star-cross’d Juliet asked almost the same question. The answer is everything

Unlike her parents, Juliet couldn’t care less about her intended’s surname. Names, as far as she was concerned, were just artificial constructs. Better consider the person than their name, she declared.

Poor soon-to-die-tragically Juliet was wrong. She couldn’t escape the conventions of her time.

Yet ironically, where Juliet was referring to Romeo’s surname, Montague, it’s their Christian names which have bestowed immortality upon them. Mononymically speaking.

In connected 21st-century Britain, and even abroad, names are so much more than names. They’re brands. We connect with them in milliseconds.

How did it come to this?

How did it come to this?

Being known by your first name alone is the very pinnacle of instant, connected success: Jesus, Elvis, Bono, Moses, Banksy, Donovan, Ella, Maggie, Pele, Napoleon, Michelangelo, Galileo, Superman/woman. Whoever. Add your own. Read more…

The EU Referendum’s unique marketing opportunities


114 and counting. Now we know the day: it’s June 23rd. Calendar events like this don’t pop up that often.

So…exciting or what! Have you made your mind up? Are you for staying in or hoping for Brexit?

Outta here

Outta here

That’s half the problem, really. As yet there isn’t a cute little antonym for Brexit: the antis’ neat little neologism that sums up the whole bloody mess instantaneously. Like Grexit did. And as Frexit is being bandied around.

So…calling all Marketeers: time to make your name. Leave a legacy. Decide that antonym for Brexit.

And before Kit-Kat comes out with another of its neat and really topical little ads…”Have an emergency break (geddit!)” might be the one to go for, guys. But remember: you heard it here first.

Have an emergency brake?

Needless to say, the newspapers (poor Indie excepted, RIP) are / will be awash.

Pundits have already been involved in wall-to-wall weekend telly interviews and front-page splashes.

And more determined to out-regal our own dearly beloved monarch, Bojo, Mayor of London, kept the nation waiting to pronounce his intentions. That’s his career intentions, by the way.

For making-a-name-for-himself-Bojo, #EU Referendum is all about him. Nothing less. So he’s a declared Brexit-er now. Chess game career machinations. Judge a man by the company he keeps: George Galloway, IDS, Chris Grayling… I bet you just can’t wait to get cold called by one of them. Read more…